Is Islam a Religion?

Short answer; no.

The standard rebuttal that all faiths have at one time or another shown themselves prone to violence and repression misses the essential point. All the major religions have reformed themselves, reducing or eliminating the all-too-human tendency to sanctimonious oppression—and none of these faiths, let us remember, endorsed oppression as a universal creedal or Divine imperative. Such is not the case with Islam, a communion that since its inception in the 7th century has seldom strayed from its sanguinary path of carnage and subdual.…

… The Founders, Bynum asserts, “clearly meant to define religion in a Judeo-Christian context.” Islam, however, “is self-segregating, fosters ideas of Muslim supremacy and thereby sows seeds of social discord.” What kind of religion, we might ask, degrades women as second-class citizens, approves anti-Semitism, preaches hatred against “infidels,” sponsors terrorist attacks on an almost daily basis with Koranic warrant, and wishes to impose Sharia, “a parallel legal system based on inequality,” on its Western host countries?

Furthermore, as we have seen, Islam insists on territorial sovereignty and does not distinguish between theology and politics, which is why its definitional status as a “religion” is or should be moot.

Source: Is Islam a Religion?

Sex and State Power

In the Muslim world, women are viewed as temptresses, and men as feeble creatures incapable of resisting feminine wiles. The only way to control the anarchy that this perceived sexual imbalance creates is for the State — and remember that Islam and the State are indistinguishable from each other — to exert total dominion over the women within its reach.

Source: Sex and State Power

The Elusive American Husband | Suzanne Venker

Every week I hear from breadwinning wives and mothers who are exhausted, stressed out and resentful about having to earn an income while at the same time be a mother. I also hear from strong, successful single women who for the life of them can’t find a husband.

It would appear we changed the rules, and the new rules don’t work.

Source: The Elusive American Husband | Suzanne Venker

What I Learned in the Peace Corps in Africa: Trump Is Right

Non-Westerners do not magically become American by arriving on our shores with a visa.

The Ten Commandments were not disobeyed – they were unknown.  The value system was the exact opposite.  You were supposed to steal everything you can to give to your own relatives.  There are some Westernized Africans who try to rebel against the system.  They fail.…

Americans think it is a universal human instinct to do unto others as you would have them do unto you.  It’s not.  It seems natural to us because we live in a Bible-based Judeo-Christian culture.

We think the Protestant work ethic is universal.  It’s not.  My town was full of young men doing nothing.  They were waiting for a government job.  There was no private enterprise.  Private business was not illegal, just impossible, given the nightmare of a third-world bureaucratic kleptocracy.  It is also incompatible with Senegalese insistence on taking care of relatives.

Frankly, they sound a lot like Democrats. No wonder Democrats want open borders.

Source: What I Learned in the Peace Corps in Africa: Trump Is Right

Dispatches from the Race War

The race war rages on the culture front:

Mary Reid, assistant professor at University of Toronto’s Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, worries math tests for all new teachers could lead to fewer visible minorities entering the profession.”

The purpose of schooling is to include visible minorities. A math test uncomfortably approximates an intelligence test. These make the obvious…well, obvious. Another step backward toward the Olduvai Gorge.

Source: Dispatches from the Race War

The Cost of Bad Intentions

Shriver and like-minded policymakers designed programs far more ambitious than those of the New Deal liberalism that had characterized the Democratic Party since Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s election in 1932. Though the New Deal vastly expanded the government safety net, it still recognized a connection between work and upward mobility and viewed government’s role as that of a temporary helper when someone was truly down and out. The officials behind the War on Poverty, by contrast, saw the poor as powerless, crushed by economic and cultural forces that could be overcome only with massive government help. Instead of temporary aid, welfare would now be a right, which the poor were entitled to receive, and benefits became far more generous, so that, by the late 1970s, welfare payments and other government aid now brought in about as much money as low-wage work.

Read the whole thing.

Source: The Cost of Bad Intentions

Heading for civil war

Codevilla notes that prominent Democrats like Barack Obama, Nancy Pelosi, and Hillary Clinton have led millions of their followers “to think and act as if conservatives were simply a lower level of humanity, and should have their faces rubbed in their own inferiority.”

It’s not surprising that many ordinary followers have concluded that harassing conservatives in restaurants, airports, and public functions is not just permissible but praiseworthy, and if thousands of persons who exercise power over cities, towns, and schools have not concluded that facilitating such harassment and harm is their duty.

Stock up on guns, ammo, food, water…

Source: Heading for civil war