The Overthrow of the Great Books

The professors act this way because they are suffused with ressentiment. Ressentiment is, of course, Nietzsche’s term for a certain state of mind, or rather, a condition of being. He liked the French word because it signified a deeper psychology than the German (and English) equivalent does. Ressentiment is the attitude of slave morality, Nietzsche wrote, the moral formation of one who feels rage and envy but hasn’t the strength or courage to act upon them. A man of ressentiment knows and resents his own weakness and mediocrity, and he hates the sight of greatness, which only reminds the lesser party of his own inferiority. And so he fashions a new moral system whereby victimhood becomes a high badge, suspicion signifies a sensitive eye for justice, and group denunciation of lone dissenters is the surest path to virtue.

I grew up with a set of the Great Books in my home. I was the only one who used them, and I still have them. With a set of these books I don’t need to deal with, or pay exhorbitant sums to, mediocre professors (but I repeat myself).

Source: The Overthrow of the Great Books

 

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cruithni

Right-wing, Conservative, Constitutionalist, Christian, Heterosexual. How else can I offend you today?